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How to reset your network adapter in Windows 11

Are you having problems connecting to the Internet in Windows 11? Or maybe you are having issues with your local network connection. If so, you might need to reset your network adapter in Windows 11.

How to reset your network adapter in Windows 11

When it comes to the Internet, there can be several things that could be preventing you from making a connection. It could be as simple as a misconfigured firewall or a bad proxy.

But with Windows 11, a good portion of all network problems can be resolved by resetting the network adapter. And there are two (2) different ways of doing it; Simple and Advanced.

Now there are pros and cons to resetting your network adapter. If your computer is a member of a corporate domain or network, you may want to contact your administrator before resetting your network adapter. There could be some network settings that have to be manually entered in the network configuration.

Also, if you have a VPN (Virtual Private Network) or virtual appliance set up, resetting the network adapter might affect it. Resetting the network adapter can also reset the Windows Firewall.

The simple way to reset your network adapter in Windows 11

  1. Left-click on the Start button Windows logo to bring up the Start menu and select Settings in the pinned apps.
  2. In the left-hand column, left-click on the Network and internet category.
  3. In the right-hand column, left-click on Advanced network settings.
  4. In the right-hand column, left-click on Network reset.
  5. Left-click on Reset now. You will get a prompt asking you are sure you want to reset your network settings.
  6. Left-click on Yes, and your computer will restart within five (5) minutes.

or

  1. Right-click on the Start button Windows logo to bring up the Power User menu.
  2. Left-click on Settings.
  3. In the left-hand column, left-click on the Network and internet category.
  4. In the right-hand column, left-click on Advanced network settings.
  5. In the right-hand column, left-click on Network reset.
  6. Left-click on Reset now. You will get a prompt asking you are sure you want to reset your network settings.
  7. Left-click on Yes, and your computer will restart within five (5) minutes.

or

  1. Press the Windows logo key Windows logo key + X to bring up the Power User menu.
  2. Press the letter N to select Settings.
  3. In the left-hand column, left-click on the Network and internet category.
  4. In the right-hand column, left-click on Advanced network settings.
  5. In the right-hand column, left-click on Network reset.
  6. Left-click on Reset now. You will get a prompt asking you are sure you want to reset your network settings.
  7. Left-click on Yes, and your computer will restart within five (5) minutes.

or

  1. Press the Windows logo key Windows logo key + I to bring up Settings.
  2. In the left-hand column, left-click on the Network and internet category.
  3. In the right-hand column, left-click on Advanced network settings.
  4. In the right-hand column, left-click on Network reset.
  5. Left-click on Reset now. You will get a prompt asking you are sure you want to reset your network settings.
  6. Left-click on Yes, and your computer will restart within five (5) minutes.

The advanced way to reset your network adapter in Windows 11

Windows 11 has a command-line utility called Netsh (Network Shell) that allows you to display and modify your computer's network configuration. The most common use of Netsh is to reset the TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol) stack back to default. Since Netsh is a command-line tool, you will need to use a Command Prompt with Administrative privileges.

How to open a Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11 (link will open in a separate window)

Netsh commands for resetting your network adapter in Windows 11

A Windows 11 administrative command prompt running Netsh commands

Note: This section is intended for advanced computer users. If you are not comfortable with advanced troubleshooting, ask someone for help. Follow these steps to reset the Windows Firewall, TCP/IP stack, and Winsock manually. You will have to restart your system to complete the reset.

The following is a list of the Netsh commands with descriptions that you can use to reset your network adapter in Windows 11:

netsh advfirewall reset

Restores the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security policy to the default policy. The current active policy can be optionally exported to a specified file. This command returns all settings to not configured and deletes all connection security and firewall rules in a Group Policy object.

netsh int ip reset

Removes all user-configured IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4) settings. Restarting the computer is required before the default settings take effect.

netsh int ipv6 reset

Removes all user-configured IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6) settings. Restarting the computer is required before the default settings take effect.

netsh winsock reset

Resets Winsock Catalog to a clean state. All Winsock Layered Service Providers, which were previously installed, must be reinstalled. This command does not affect Winsock Name Space Provider entries.

How to open a Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11

There may be a time when you need to bypass the Windows GUI (Graphical User Interface) and enter commands directly into an Administrative Command Prompt. Quite a few of our favorite Geeks Tips require the use of it. So here's how to open a Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11.

The Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11
The Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11

Open a Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11

  1. Left-click on the Start button Windows logo to bring up the Start menu.
  2. In the upper right-hand corner of the Start menu, left-click on All apps.
  3. Scroll down the list of programs and left-click on Windows Tools.
  4. Right-click on Command Prompt.
  5. On the context menu that appears, left-click on Run as administrator. If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

or

  1. Left-click on the magnifying glass to the right of the Start button Windows logo to bring up the Search dialog box.
  2. In the Search dialog box, type Command Prompt.
  3. In the list of results, the Command Prompt should be highlighted.
  4. In the right-hand column under Command Prompt, there is an options menu. Left-click on Run as administrator. If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

Using the Power User menu to open a Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11

  1. Right-click on the Start button Windows logo to bring up the Power User menu.
  2. Left-click on Windows Terminal (Admin). If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  3. On the title bar, left-click on the pull-down menu and left-click on Command Prompt.

or

  1. Press the Windows logo key Windows logo key + X to bring up the Power User menu.
  2. Press the letter A to select Windows Terminal (Admin). If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  3. On the title bar, left-click on the pull-down menu and left-click on Command Prompt.

How to change the default program for Windows Terminal

  1. Right-click on the Start button Windows logo to bring up the Power User menu.
  2. Left-click on Windows Terminal (Admin). If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  3. On the title bar, left-click on the pull-down menu
    The Settings pull down menu for Windows Terminal inside of Windows 11
    and left-click on Settings.
  4. In the right-hand column under Startup, left-click on the Default profile pull-down menu
    The Default profile pull down menu for Windows Terminal inside of Windows 11
    and left-click on Command Prompt.

or

  1. Press the Windows logo key Windows logo key + X to bring up the Power User menu.
  2. Press the letter A to select Windows Terminal (Admin). If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  3. On the title bar, left-click on the pull-down menu
    The Settings pull down menu for Windows Terminal inside of Windows 11
    and left-click on Settings.
  4. In the right-hand column under Startup, left-click on the Default profile pull-down menu
    The Default profile pull down menu for Windows Terminal inside of Windows 11
    and left-click on Command Prompt.

Windows 11 hardware requirements explained

Are you confused about the hardware requirements for Windows 11? Want to know why your computer can or cannot be upgraded to Windows 11? Let's take a detailed look at the hardware requirements for Windows 11.

Windows 11 hardware requirements explained

With Windows 11, Microsoft is focusing on security and is starting to enforce the hardware requirements to run it. Previous versions of Windows (10, 8.1, and 7) all had the exact general hardware requirement.

But with Windows 10, the security requirements were still there, but they were not being enforced. The Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), Secure Boot, and Trusted Platform Module (TPM) (see below) requirements were optional for Windows 10 to install and run.

Case in point, TPM has always been required for BitLocker encryption to be enabled. Windows 10 would use either TPM 1.2 or TPM 2.0. But the TPM 1.2 standard has been depreciated, so TPM 2.0 is now the defacto standard.

And if you look into UEFI, you will find that Secure Boot is part of that standard. And since UEFI can take advantage of TPM, it makes sense to include all three (3) in the requirements for Windows 11.

Note: Sorry for anybody still running a 32-bit version of Windows 10, but Windows 11 is only available in a 64-bit version.

Hardware requirements for Windows 7, 8.1 and 10

Processor - 1 Gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor

Memory - 1 Gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit)

Storage - 16 GB (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)

Graphics card - Compatible with DirectX 9 with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver

Hardware requirements for Windows 11

Processor - 1 Gigahertz (GHz) or faster with two or more cores on a compatible 64-bit processor or System on a Chip (SoC). This requirement is now particular on what processors are compatible with Windows 11. General Rule of thumb: If the processor is less than three (3) years old, it should run Windows 11. Microsoft has a list of processors that are compatible with Windows 11.

Memory - 4 Gigabytes (GB) RAM. This requirement has increased from 2GB to 4GB, which is no biggie. I have not seen a computer with only 2 GB of memory in over a decade now.

Storage - 64 GB or larger storage device. This requirement has also increased, and it is about time. I have seen Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 installed on 32 GB drives, which is not pretty. The biggest problem is there usually is not enough free space to perform a feature update. I recommend at least a 256 GB drive for the operating system and programs.

Graphics card - DirectX 12 graphics device or later with WDDM 2.0 driver. Since DirectX 12 was released with Windows 10 back in 2015, most modern graphic cards will be compatible with Windows 11.

Hardware requirements that are no longer optional

Display - High definition (720p) display greater than 9" diagonally, 8 bits per color channel. This requirement is pretty easy to meet.

System firmware - UEFI and Secure Boot capable. UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) has been used for over a decade now, so most computers running have UEFI enabled. And since the Secure Boot specification is part of the UEFI, that too should already be in place. However, you may have to change some settings in your computer's BIOS (Basic Input / Output System) to enable UEFI and Secure Boot.

TPM - Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0. Besides the processor requirement, this is another stumbling point for upgrading to Windows 11. A TPM can be a separate module that you connect to your motherboard or be part of the chipset on your motherboard. Most modern motherboards will use FTPM (Firmware Trusted Platform Module) that is included in the chipset. However, you may have to change some settings in your computer's BIOS (Basic Input / Output System) to enable the TPM.

Storage structure - There are two (2) types of drive structures; MBR (Master Boot Record) and GPT (GUID Partition Table). Previous versions of Windows would run on either of these structures. Windows 11 requires GTP for the drive that contains Windows 11. Microsoft has included a tool inside Windows 10 to convert drives from MBR to GPT. Here is a link to the documentation for MBR2GPT.EXE.

Windows logo key shortcuts for Windows 11

In 1995, Microsoft released Windows 95, and navigating Windows was changed forever. Along with introducing the Start menu, Microsoft also added a new modifier key to PC keyboards, the Windows logo key.

Windows logo key shortcuts for Windows 11

Like the Command key on Apple keyboards, it allows the user to run shortcuts to open programs or execute repetitive commands, like showing the Desktop. Windows 95 had only twelve Windows logo key shortcuts, as Windows 11 has over fifty. So here is the complete list of Windows logo key shortcuts inside of Windows 11.

Windows logo key shortcuts for Windows 11

Press To
Windows logo key Open Start menu
Windows logo key + A Open Quick Settings (part of the Action Center)
Windows logo key + B Highlights Show Hidden Icons on Taskbar
Windows logo key + C Open Microsoft Teams
Windows logo key + D Show Desktop
Windows logo key + E Open File Explorer
Windows logo key + F Open Feedback Hub
The following six (6) Windows logo key shortcuts are for the Game Bar
Windows logo key + G Open the Game Bar
Windows logo key + Alt + G Record the last few moments of gameplay. (you can change the amount of time recorded in Game Bar > Settings)
Windows logo key + Alt + R Start / stop recording
Windows logo key + Alt + Print Screen Take a screenshot of your game
Windows logo key + Alt + T Show / hide the recording timer
Windows logo key + Alt + M Start / stop microphone recording
Windows logo key + H Open Speech Services (voice dictation)
Windows logo key + I Open Settings
Windows logo key + K Open Cast (connect to wireless display and audio devices)
Windows logo key + L Switch users (lock computer if on a domain)
Windows logo key + M Minimize all open windows (show Desktop)
Windows logo key + N Opens Notification Center (part of the Action Center)
Windows logo key + P Open Project (project video to another screen)
Windows logo key + Q Opens Search dialog box
Windows logo key + R Opens Run dialog box
Windows logo key + S Opens Search dialog box
Windows logo key + T Set focus on Taskbar and cycle through pinned / running desktop apps
Windows logo key + U Opens Accessibility section in Settings
Windows logo key + V Displays Clipboard history
Windows logo key + W Opens Widgets
Windows logo key + X Opens Power User menu
Windows logo key + Z Opens Snap layouts menu
Windows logo key + 1-9 Go to the app at the given position on the Taskbar
Windows logo key + + (plus) Zoom in (Magnifier)
Windows logo key + - (minus) Zoom out (Magnifier)
Windows logo key + , (comma) Peek at the Desktop
Windows logo key + Spacebar Switch input language and keyboard layout
Windows logo key + Tab Show all open apps and view additional desktops
Windows logo key + Esc Close Magnifier
Windows logo key + Home Minimize non-active desktop windows
Windows logo key + Pause/Break Open System in Settings
Windows logo key + Left Arrow Snap desktop window to the left (+Shift to move window to left monitor)
Windows logo key + Right Arrow Snap desktop window to the right (+Shift to move window to right monitor)
Windows logo key + Up Arrow Maximize desktop window (+Shift to keep width)
Windows logo key + Down Arrow Restore/minimize desktop window (+Shift to keep width)
Windows logo key + F1 Opens How to get help in Windows 11 search in a browser
Windows logo key + Ctrl + Enter Open Narrator
Windows logo key + Ctrl + D Add a Desktop
Windows logo key + Ctrl + Right arrow Switch between desktops you’ve created on the right
Windows logo key + Ctrl + Left arrow Switch between desktops you’ve created on the left
Windows logo key + Ctrl + F4 Close the Desktop you’re using
Windows logo key + Shift + Right arrow Move an app to a monitor on the right
Windows logo key + Shift + Left arrow Move an app to a monitor on the left
Windows logo key + Period (.) or Semicolon (;) Open the emoji, kaomoji, and symbol panel
Windows logo key + Shift + S Open the Snipping Bar

For more Windows keyboard shortcuts, see the links below:

Windows logo key keyboard shortcuts

General keyboard shortcuts

Natural keyboard shortcuts

Dialog box keyboard shortcuts

Accessibility keyboard shortcuts

Windows Explorer keyboard shortcuts

Clean up your Windows 10 computer using the Storage feature

Have you ever gotten a low disk space warning on your Windows 10 computer? Do you wish you could quickly and easily clean up the unwanted temporary files and the recycle bin? If so, look no further than the Storage feature inside of Windows 10.

Clean up your Windows 10 computer using the Storage options

For years now, I have been using the Disk Cleanup program inside of each version of Windows. It has been an easy way to clean up the junk (temporary files, Internet cache, recycle bin, etc.) that can build up in Windows.

But finding the Disk Cleanup program to run it can be a little tricky. There are multiple ways to run it when you find it, which can get confusing for a novice computer user.

Thankfully, Microsoft has integrated most of the functionality of Disk Cleanup into the Storage feature inside the Windows 10 Settings program. And getting to the Storage feature could not be any easier.

The Storage feature inside of Windows 10 Settings

How to get to Storage feature in Windows 10

  1. Left-click on the Start Windows logo menu and left-click on the Gear (Settings) icon. It should be the second icon up from the bottom.
  2. Left-click on the System category
  3. In the left-hand column, left-click on Storage. All of the storage options will appear in the right-hand column.

Note: All files removed using the Storage feature are permanently deleted, so be careful what files you choose to delete. Remember that once you delete a file, it is gone for good.

There are two (2) sections under the Storage area. The first is Storage Sense, with only a slider switch to turn it on or off and a button to bring up the configuration page.

Introduced in Windows 10 version 1809, Storage Sense is a simple 'Set and Forget' utility that can automatically clean out files you do not need anymore, like files in your Downloads folder and the recycle bin.

Storage Sense can automatically clean out a user's Downloads folder and recycle bin on a preset schedule. You can set it up to run automatically every day, every week, every month, or only when you start to run out of free disk space. You can also run it manually whenever you need to free up some disk space quickly.

The second section is part of the Storage Reserve. Storage Reserve allocates space to facilitate proper performance and successful updates to Windows 10. This section lists the drives currently attached to your computer and how that storage is being distributed. That includes all fixed or removable HDDs, SSDs, and USB external drives.

Every drive has a status bar that shows the used / free space. Below the drive status bar, you will find the categories of different types of files that can be safely deleted. You may have to click on the 'Show more categories' button to view all available categories.

The list of categories is pretty extensive, so it may take some time to go through each one. The categories range from system & reserved, apps & features, and all of the special folders (Desktop, Documents, Downloads, Music, Pictures, and Videos).

Each category has also has a status bar that shows how much space those particular files are taking up. When you click on a category listed under a drive, you will be taken to another page with more options for that category.

Now when you click on the Temporary files category, you will be presented with a selection of options of which files you want to clean up. These are similar to the categories used in Disk Cleanup.

Remember that the majority of the items listed under Temporary files can be safely deleted. You may not want to remove all the files you have in your Downloads folder, so you might think about cleaning that folder up manually with File Explorer.

Also, if you choose the Windows Update Cleanup option, the clean-up process will happen the next time you reboot your computer. So be prepared for a longer boot time the next time you restart your computer.

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