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How to open a Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11

There may be a time when you need to bypass the Windows GUI (Graphical User Interface) and enter commands directly into an Administrative Command Prompt. Quite a few of our favorite Geeks Tips require the use of it. So here's how to open a Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11.

The Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11
The Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11

Open a Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11

  1. Left-click on the Start button Windows logo to bring up the Start menu.
  2. In the upper right-hand corner of the Start menu, left-click on All apps.
  3. Scroll down the list of programs and left-click on Windows Tools.
  4. Right-click on Command Prompt.
  5. On the context menu that appears, left-click on Run as administrator. If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

or

  1. Left-click on the magnifying glass to the right of the Start button Windows logo to bring up the Search dialog box.
  2. In the Search dialog box, type Command Prompt.
  3. In the list of results, the Command Prompt should be highlighted.
  4. In the right-hand column under Command Prompt, there is an options menu. Left-click on Run as administrator. If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

Using the Power User menu to open a Command Prompt with Administrator privileges in Windows 11

  1. Right-click on the Start button Windows logo to bring up the Power User menu.
  2. Left-click on Windows Terminal (Admin). If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  3. On the title bar, left-click on the pull-down menu and left-click on Command Prompt.

or

  1. Press the Windows logo key Windows logo key + X to bring up the Power User menu.
  2. Press the letter A to select Windows Terminal (Admin). If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  3. On the title bar, left-click on the pull-down menu and left-click on Command Prompt.

How to change the default program for Windows Terminal

  1. Right-click on the Start button Windows logo to bring up the Power User menu.
  2. Left-click on Windows Terminal (Admin). If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  3. On the title bar, left-click on the pull-down menu
    The Settings pull down menu for Windows Terminal inside of Windows 11
    and left-click on Settings.
  4. In the right-hand column under Startup, left-click on the Default profile pull-down menu
    The Default profile pull down menu for Windows Terminal inside of Windows 11
    and left-click on Command Prompt.

or

  1. Press the Windows logo key Windows logo key + X to bring up the Power User menu.
  2. Press the letter A to select Windows Terminal (Admin). If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  3. On the title bar, left-click on the pull-down menu
    The Settings pull down menu for Windows Terminal inside of Windows 11
    and left-click on Settings.
  4. In the right-hand column under Startup, left-click on the Default profile pull-down menu
    The Default profile pull down menu for Windows Terminal inside of Windows 11
    and left-click on Command Prompt.

Windows logo key shortcuts for Windows 11

In 1995, Microsoft released Windows 95, and navigating Windows was changed forever. Along with introducing the Start menu, Microsoft also added a new modifier key to PC keyboards, the Windows logo key.

Windows logo key shortcuts for Windows 11

Like the Command key on Apple keyboards, it allows the user to run shortcuts to open programs or execute repetitive commands, like showing the Desktop. Windows 95 had only twelve Windows logo key shortcuts, as Windows 11 has over fifty. So here is the complete list of Windows logo key shortcuts inside of Windows 11.

Windows logo key shortcuts for Windows 11

Press To
Windows logo key Open Start menu
Windows logo key + A Open Quick Settings (part of the Action Center)
Windows logo key + B Highlights Show Hidden Icons on Taskbar
Windows logo key + C Open Microsoft Teams
Windows logo key + D Show Desktop
Windows logo key + E Open File Explorer
Windows logo key + F Open Feedback Hub
The following six (6) Windows logo key shortcuts are for the Game Bar
Windows logo key + G Open the Game Bar
Windows logo key + Alt + G Record the last few moments of gameplay. (you can change the amount of time recorded in Game Bar > Settings)
Windows logo key + Alt + R Start / stop recording
Windows logo key + Alt + Print Screen Take a screenshot of your game
Windows logo key + Alt + T Show / hide the recording timer
Windows logo key + Alt + M Start / stop microphone recording
Windows logo key + H Open Speech Services (voice dictation)
Windows logo key + I Open Settings
Windows logo key + K Open Cast (connect to wireless display and audio devices)
Windows logo key + L Switch users (lock computer if on a domain)
Windows logo key + M Minimize all open windows (show Desktop)
Windows logo key + N Opens Notification Center (part of the Action Center)
Windows logo key + P Open Project (project video to another screen)
Windows logo key + Q Opens Search dialog box
Windows logo key + R Opens Run dialog box
Windows logo key + S Opens Search dialog box
Windows logo key + T Set focus on Taskbar and cycle through pinned / running desktop apps
Windows logo key + U Opens Accessibility section in Settings
Windows logo key + V Displays Clipboard history
Windows logo key + W Opens Widgets
Windows logo key + X Opens Power User menu
Windows logo key + Z Opens Snap layouts menu
Windows logo key + 1-9 Go to the app at the given position on the Taskbar
Windows logo key + + (plus) Zoom in (Magnifier)
Windows logo key + - (minus) Zoom out (Magnifier)
Windows logo key + , (comma) Peek at the Desktop
Windows logo key + Spacebar Switch input language and keyboard layout
Windows logo key + Tab Show all open apps and view additional desktops
Windows logo key + Esc Close Magnifier
Windows logo key + Home Minimize non-active desktop windows
Windows logo key + Pause/Break Open System in Settings
Windows logo key + Left Arrow Snap desktop window to the left (+Shift to move window to left monitor)
Windows logo key + Right Arrow Snap desktop window to the right (+Shift to move window to right monitor)
Windows logo key + Up Arrow Maximize desktop window (+Shift to keep width)
Windows logo key + Down Arrow Restore/minimize desktop window (+Shift to keep width)
Windows logo key + F1 Opens How to get help in Windows 11 search in a browser
Windows logo key + Ctrl + Enter Open Narrator
Windows logo key + Ctrl + D Add a Desktop
Windows logo key + Ctrl + Right arrow Switch between desktops you’ve created on the right
Windows logo key + Ctrl + Left arrow Switch between desktops you’ve created on the left
Windows logo key + Ctrl + F4 Close the Desktop you’re using
Windows logo key + Shift + Right arrow Move an app to a monitor on the right
Windows logo key + Shift + Left arrow Move an app to a monitor on the left
Windows logo key + Period (.) or Semicolon (;) Open the emoji, kaomoji, and symbol panel
Windows logo key + Shift + S Open the Snipping Bar

For more Windows keyboard shortcuts, see the links below:

Windows logo key keyboard shortcuts

General keyboard shortcuts

Natural keyboard shortcuts

Dialog box keyboard shortcuts

Accessibility keyboard shortcuts

Windows Explorer keyboard shortcuts

My first look at Windows 11

Microsoft recently announced that they are releasing a successor to Windows 10, aptly named Windows 11. So join me as I take a look at Windows 11.

My first look at Windows 11

When Microsoft announced the next version of Windows, I went looking for a beta or technical preview of Windows 11. I soon found out that the only way to get a version of Windows 11 is through their Insider Program.

Well, it just so happens that I had created a Virtual Machine (VM) a couple of years ago for the Windows 10 Insider Program. I started it, and sure enough, Windows informed me that I need to download a new build of Windows.

I went through the upgrade process, and when all was said and done, I had Windows 11 Insider Preview running inside a VM. So let's take a look at Windows 11.

Note: This build of Windows 11 that I am using for this article is just a beta, so the look and the way it operates may and probably will change before the final release of Windows 11.

Login Screen

The Windows 11 Logon Screen

Not much different here from Windows 10. The default font has changed, but other than that, it looks and feels like Windows 10.

Taskbar

The Windows 11 Taskbar

The first thing you will notice when the Desktop appears is that the Start button and pinned programs are centered in the Taskbar. Is this by default, and can it be easily changed back to left-justified.

Start Menu

The Windows 11 Start Menu

The Start Menu has gotten a makeover, with a new cleaner looking layout. All the same features are available, but they are arranged completely different.

Power User menu

The Windows 11 Power Users menu

It is still there, The only component of Windows 8.1 to still be inside of Windows. Don't remember Windows 8.1? That is one version of Windows I would love to forget.

Settings

The Windows 11 Settings app

As with the Start Menu, the Settings app has also received a makeover, getting broken into two (2) columns. The categories are now listed in the left-side column, and sub-categories are listed in the right-hand column.

Control Panel

The Windows 11 Control Panel

Microsoft has been trying to eliminate the Control Panel for a while now, but it still exists in the preview build I am running. Who knows if it will make it to the final build of Windows 11.

File Explorer

The Windows 11 File Explorer

File Explorer has gotten a small makeover too. The Ribbon appears to be gone, and a simple toolbar with the most commons functions has taken its place. We will have to wait until the final build to see if the Ribbon is truly gone.

The overall look and feel of Windows 11 is smoother than Windows 10. With rounded corners on dialog boxes and newer icons, Windows 11 looks like an excellent successor to Windows 10.

But of course, we will have to wait and see how the final build of Windows 11 looks and feels. For a more in-depth look at this version of Windows 11, check out the video below.

Create, extract and edit archive files with 7-Zip

For decades now, we have been compressing files and folders to make them smaller to attach to an e-mail or archive. I have used many archiving programs over the years, but the best one I have found is 7-Zip.

The 7-Zip File Manager

7-Zip is one of the most straightforward archiving programs I have ever used. It can work with a ton of different file types and has a high compression rate.

7-Zip can create several different archive files, including ZIP, TAR, and of course, 7z. And it can also open over thirty (30) other archive formats, including CAB, DMG, ISO, and RAR.

The 7-Zip File Manager is straightforward to use and has a ton of features. Besides being able to create and open archive files, it can also edit them, including splitting and combining archive files.

But the best feature is the right-click context menu. You can right-click on some files or folders and quickly create an archive file from them (7z or ZIP).

The 7-Zip right-click context menu

Or you can right-click on an archive file and quickly open, extract or test it. And the cool thing is you can edit the functions that the right-click menu can perform.

7-Zip is an open-source program that began over twenty years (20) ago and is still going strong. It has been translated into over ten (10) different languages, including French, Spanish, and German.

7-Zip is available in either 32 or 64-bit versions and can run on all Windows versions from Windows XP and up. And it is free to use for either personal or commercial use.

For more information on 7-Zip, follow the link below.

7-Zip

Synchronize folders and files on your Windows computer with Allway Sync

Are you looking for an easy way to synchronize your files to another computer on your network? Or maybe you want to sync to an external drive or the cloud. If so, then take a look at Allway Sync by Botkind.

Synchronize folders and files on your Windows computer with Allway Sync

For years now, I have been using synchronization programs to make an exact copy of my files on network drives and external devices. Over ten years ago, Microsoft released a straightforward file synchronization program called SyncToy.

But Microsoft dropped support for SyncToy a few years ago, and eventually, it stopped working correctly. That is when I started looking for another synchronization application and found Allway Sync.

Windows 10 does have a built-in file sync program called File History, but it is pretty basic. With File History, you can sync to a network folder or external drive, but not to the cloud.

On the other hand, Allway Sync can sync to a local or network folder, FTP / SFTP server, Google Drive, Dropbox, OneDrive, and several different cloud storage types. You can even sync to a single archive file.

The user interface inside of Allway Sync
The user interface inside of Allway Sync

The user interface is simple to use and easy to understand. The sync options are quite extensive and include data compression and encryption. You can set up multiple sync jobs and customize each job to meet your needs.

The sync job options menu inside of Allway Sync
The sync job options menu inside of Allway Sync

The options for sync jobs include synchronization rules, automatic synchronization, inclusion and exclusion filters, file versioning, error handling, and custom actions.

I have several clients that use synchronization software for backing up files. The primary reason is that files can be recovered quickly, as they do not have to be decrypted. Just copy the file you want to be recovered back to the original folder.

Allway Sync is free for personal use, with a limit of 40,000 files per 30 day period. But for unlimited file synchronization, purchasing a Pro license is recommended. FYI - A pro license is not that expensive (under $30).

There are a couple of different editions of Allway Sync, a desktop edition for installing on desktops, laptops, and servers. There is also an edition, Allway Sync 'n' Go, a portable version for installing on external drives.

Allway Sync comes in 32-bit and 64-bit versions compatible with Windows 10, Windows 8.1, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2016, and Windows Server 2019. They even have versions that will run on Windows 2000 and Windows XP.

For more information on Allway Sync by Botkind, click on the link below.

Allway Sync by Botkind

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